Beauty Angles

cropped-realbarbie.png  Beauty does indeed come in all shapes and sizes.  No longer are the days of one size fits all when “cover girls” reigned. Women today are encouraged to express themselves in traditional and non-traditional ways, (we’re talking tattoos and body piercing here). But one has to ask, where does it all begin?

In my book MR. BEAUTY:  AN AFFAIR WITH THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY, based on a study on how women look at beauty brands and products today, what I discovered is that women do not approach the topic of beauty in the same manner. Interestingly, they viewed the topic of beauty care in relationship to their daily lives and early influences, mostly mothers, sisters and girlfriends.  This learning only underscored how subjective and vast the topic of beauty is and that what may be the beginning of a conversation for one on the topic may have very little interest for another.  It was far more practical than I expected.

When talking about beauty care on a personal level, women felt comfortable addressing the topic based on what they did in their daily routines, what had influenced them and, most importantly, how comfortable they felt about their own beauty.  The underlying insight was the importance that was placed on care and overall beauty enhancement.  Not one interviewee ever mentioned how she wished she looked different. When one did mention a desire for smoother hair or healthier skin it was in the context of what they do to achieve it in a proactive way.

Lastly, I found it interesting that celebrities were never mentioned, nor were industry catch phrases like “radiant skin”, “silky, shiny hair” or “revolutionary wrinkle repair”. The language was very straight forward, practical, and simple when talking to the interviewees about what beauty care meant to them.

Learn more about this subject from my book, mrbeautybook.com  All proceeds benefit Pancreatic Cancer Research in honor of Eileen McKenna.

Purchase the book at amazon.com/gp/product/1508619573